LEARNING

Learning At The Potter's Wheel is a collection of articles on home, family, marriage, parenting, natural medicine and herbs. . . along with a few other items of interest. Have fun sorting through my junk drawer of assorted thoughts and ramblings.

AT THE POTTER'S WHEEL

The Potter has persisted in giving me treasures I don't always understand or appreciate. Patiently, He is teaching me to trust that all I really need to know is that I am in HIS hands. . .

HENNA


ALSO KNOWN AS:
Lawsonia inermis

Henne, Al-Khanna,

Al-henna
, Jamaica
Mignonette
Mehndi, Mendee

Egyptian Privet, Smooth Lawsonia

PARTS USED
Flowers, powdered leaves, fruit

PHYTOCHEMICALS & NUTRIENTS
A brown substance in Henna has a resinoid fracture. This chemical property (which characterize tannins) is where the name hannotannic acid is derived. The red-orange dye molecule, lawsone, bonds with proteins, helping it stain skin, hair, fingernails, leather, silk and wool.

PROPERTIES & USES
Powdered Henna leaves have been in use from the ancient times in Eastern countries.

The dye molecule, lawsone, is found primarily in the leaves, and is in the highest levels in the petioles (or the stalk) of the leaf. As a dye for the skin or nails the powder may be mixed with catechu or lucerne, made into a paste with hot water, and spread on the part to be dyed, being allowed to remain for one night.

Since 1890 Henna has been widely used in Europe for tinting the hair. This is usually done in the form of a shampoo. Many shades can be mixed by using the leaves of other plants, such as indigo or cassia. There are no such plants as black henna or neutral henna. Companies which make such claims use these other leaves or chemicals to achieve the variations. A product marketed as black or neutral Henna may contain unlisted dyes and chemicals. Henna’s natural coloration, when used for dyeing the hair and the nails, is a reddish-yellow color.

CAUTIONS & CONSIDERATIONS
If you aren’t certain whether you will like the result, take the time to test Henna in an inconspicuous place before treating a large area.

Disclaimer: None of this is to be considered a substitute for medical examination and/or treatment. Use what you will, but do so knowing that you must consider your own circumstance and the application of these things with sound judgment.




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