LEARNING

Learning At The Potter's Wheel is a collection of articles on home, family, marriage, parenting, natural medicine and herbs. . . along with a few other items of interest. Have fun sorting through my junk drawer of assorted thoughts and ramblings.

AT THE POTTER'S WHEEL

The Potter has persisted in giving me treasures I don't always understand or appreciate. Patiently, He is teaching me to trust that all I really need to know is that I am in HIS hands. . .

CHAMOMILE

ALSO KNOWN AS:
Matricaria recutita or M. chamomilla
German chamomile, wild chamomile
Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) is less common.

PARTS USED
Flowers, plant

PHYTOCHEMICALS & NUTRIENTS
Alpha-bisabolol, apigenin, azulene, borneol, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, choline, farnesol, gentisic acid, geraniol, hyperoside, kaempferol, luteolin, p-coumaric acid, perillyl alcohol, quercetin, rutin, salicylic acid, sinapic acid, tannin, umbelliferone. vitamins B1, B3, and C

PROPERTIES & USES
Traditionally, chamomile has been used as a remedy for stress (nerve tonic), anxiety, indigestion and insomnia. As a tonic, Chamomile’s properties are soothing and relaxing, helping to relieve pain and an assortment of discomforts, including headaches and fever. Chamomile can help regulate menstrual flow and relieve menstrual cramps.

Chamomile’s diuretic properties help relieve water retention. Its warming action brings blood to the surface of the skin, causing perspiration, by which toxins can be released. Chamomile has been known to help cope with the effects of drug withdrawal.

Aiding digestion and stimulating the appetite, Chamomile has proved helpful for colitis, and diverticulosis. This herb is often found in herbal preparations for stomach disorders.

As a mouthwash, Chamomile is a useful treatment for minor mouth and gum infections.

CAUTIONS & CONSIDERATIONS
Should not be used daily for long periods of time, as this may lead to ragweed allergy. Should be used with caution by those who are allergic to ragweed.
Should not be used with sedatives or alcohol.

Disclaimer: None of this is to be considered a substitute for medical examination and/or treatment. Use what you will, but do so knowing that you must consider your own circumstance and the application of these things with sound judgment.




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